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Emotional and Mental

Grief Series: I'm Suffering From Heartache

I’m suffering from heartache, I am physically drained

Grief is emotionally exhausting and when we are emotionally exhausted, our bodies can also become physically exhausted. It takes a lot of energy to grieve.  First of all, there is the shock (even if the death was expected) of your loved one passing away.

Then, there is the flurry of activity with notifying family and friends, planning the funeral and burial arrangements and visiting with those who come to pay their respects. To many, it feels like they are going non-stop for days. Your body needs to recover from the emotional and physical toll taken on it.

Here are some things you can do to take care of yourself:

  • Get enough sleep. You may need a little more sleep than your normal pattern due to not sleeping as well during the night or due to all of the extra activity. It is okay to take a nap. It is okay to turn off your phone or ask to be uninterrupted so you can take a nap.
  • Drink plenty of water. Our bodies are about 60% water and it is vitally important to supply water to our bodies, especially in times of stress. The flip side of having enough water is being dehydrated which can cause headaches, joint pain, muscle pain, constipation and fatigue. If you are experiencing those symptoms, perhaps you need to intake more water.
  • Eat healthy, balanced meals. Try not to alter your regular eating routine. There may be times when you don’t have an appetite and need to be reminded to nourish your body.
  • Move. Get your body moving. To some that means continuing on with a regular exercise routine. To others that means making sure you are doing more than just sitting in your chair all day. Take a walk – even if it is just down to the end of the driveway or long hallway. Make it a point to move.
  • Be careful to not isolate yourself. It’s okay to want to have time to just be by yourself – as long as you remember that you also need to interact with other people. Sometimes you need to try to do things with others even if you don’t really feel like it.
Losing someone close can be difficult to handle alone. Do you need help?  Call (800) 801-4182 or (402) 354-8000 to schedule a confidential appointment. You can also access our web site www.BestCareEAP.org.

About the Author

Amy has been in the counseling field since 1997, with Best Care since 1999. 

Education: BS in Human Development, MS in Community Counseling; Licensed Mental Health Practitioner with an Emphasis in Counseling, MS in Professional Counseling with an Emphasis in Childhood and Adolescence Disorders

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Amy Monzingo